Get into Bed with Leigh Greenwood (Author Interview)

to love and to cherishKeira: Laurie Spencer, the heroine of To Love and to Cherish, feels trapped by her life and particularly by her family. If you were her best friend, what would you tell her?  

Leigh Greenwood: My first impulse would be to tell her to leave her husband, but women on the frontier had few rights and fewer chances for legal support.  Since her parents wouldn’t support her, she would need the support of other family members.  Still, she was a young and beautiful woman.  I would say her chances of finding a caring husband were very good.

Keira: What advice would you give to Jared Smith, the hero of the story, if you were his best friend?  

Leigh: Figure out the money as best he could, but don’t take a chance on losing Laurie.

Keira: What’s your perception of the genre as a male author writing romance? How did you come to write in this genre?

Leigh: I think it’s a wonderful genre and don’t see why so many people look down on it.  That we have excellent writers is proved by their presence on the bestsellers lists.  They can write anything from character-driven stories to action/adventure and science fiction/futuristic.  I think many people are too afraid of their emotions to be able to appreciate romance.  I write romance because I enjoy the interaction between characters that leads to a happy ending.  I also like cowboys and children so it all works together to create a story that, regardless of the setting, can be pertinent to modern situations.

Keira: What’s your favorite part about writing about cowboys and cowgirls and the West?

Leigh: I like the chance to include the kind of action and adventure that you can’t put in most present-day settings.

Keira: How do you define love? How can someone recognize their soul mate / true love?  

Leigh: There really is no answer to that question because it’s different for every couple.  It even changes when a person finds a new partner because no two people are the same.  What they bring to the relationship and what they need from it will be different.  The best I can offer is that being with that one person makes you happy, fulfilled, content, so much so you’re willing to work your butt of to keep it.

Keira: If you could travel anywhere and in any time period, where would you go and why?  

Leigh: It would be hard to choose between ancient Greece and ancient Rome.  I’ve always been fascinated by ancient civilizations.  These two made enormous contributions to our modern world.

Keira: What can we expect from you next?  

Leigh: I have two more books in the Cactus Creek series that will disclose the secret that caused the town to pick up and move west.

To Love and to Cherish by Leigh Greenwood

Torn Between a Desire to be Free…

When Laurie Spencer said “I do”, she never realized she’d be trading one pair of shackles for another—until her husband’s unexpected death leaves her with an opportunity to escape her controlling family for good. Determined to be independent, Laurie approaches sexy rancher Jared Smith with an offer she hopes he can’t refuse…

And a Longing to be His…

Jared’s determined to make it in Texas, but with the local banker turned against him, it looks like his dream may be slipping through his fingers. When unconsciously sensual Laurie offers a partnership, his luck may be changing…but when she throws herself in as part of the deal, Jared’s not sure he’ll be able to respect the terms of their agreement and keep his eyes—and his hands—to himself.

There’s something about Laurie that awakens every protective instinct Jared has…and when all hell breaks loose, there’s nothing and no one who’ll be able to keep this cowboy from her side.

Buy: To Love and to Cherish (Cactus Creek Cowboys Book 2)

Leigh Greenwood is the USA Today bestselling author of the popular Seven Brides, Cowboys, and Night Riders series. The proud father of three grown children, Leigh resides in Charlotte, North Carolina. He never intended to be a writer, but he found it hard to ignore the people in his head, and the only way to get them out was to write. Visit him at www.leigh-greenwood.com.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Top 5 Favorite Historical Romances Set in America

Stacy HenrieGuest blog by Stacy Henrie, author of Hope at Dawn

When asked what my favorite historical romances set in America are, it was a struggle! Here are five that I love and recommend:

  1. She Walks in Beauty by Siri Mitchell
  2. Short-Straw Bride by Karen Witemeyer
  3. Against the Tide by Elizabeth Camden
  4. Rebellious Heart by Jody Hedlund
  5. Love on the Line by Deeanne Gist

Henrie_HopeatDawn_MMBook Blurb:

IN A TIME OF WAR, LOVE IS THE INSPIRATION.

With her brothers away fighting the Great War overseas, Livy Campbell desperately wants to help her family. Her chance comes when she meets a handsome stranger who lands her a job as a teacher in a place far from her parents’ farm. But the war casts a long shadow over the German-American town that Livy now calls home-and the darkness will test everything she thought she knew about family and love . . .

More than anything, Friedrick Wagner wants to be part of his adopted country’s struggle for peace. But when the bitter animosity between Germans and Americans soon turns citizens against newcomers, friend against friend, he will do whatever it takes to protect Livy from the hysteria that grips their town. As tragedy-and dark secrets from the past-threaten their future, Friedrick and Livy have one chance to stand up for what’s right . . . and one chance to fight for their love.

Excerpt:

After another fifteen minutes had crawled by, Livy forced herself to accept the likelihood that Robert—for whatever painful reason—had chosen to spend her birthday with a bottle cradled in his arms instead of her. Hot tears of anger sprang up behind her eyes and no amount of blinking could keep several of them from leaking onto her face.

“Are you all right?”

Livy whipped her chin up and found herself peering into eyes more brilliantly blue than she’d suspected from her seat across the room. Their clear depths exuded friendly concern in a way that made her feel immediately safe, though she didn’t know anything about this young man. Up close, his Sunday shirt and pressed trousers, though worn, accentuated his strong-looking physique.

She blinked, trying to remember what he’d asked her. Something about her being all right? “Yes. Thank you. I’m just fine.”

She swept away the salty drops from her cheeks. Of course her first real cry in ten years would be witnessed by a stranger, and yet, his self-assured, compassionate manner made her suspect he didn’t find her silly.

“You look like you could use a dance.” He crouched down in front of her and held out his hand. “How about it?”

Livy darted a quick look at the entrance again. “I’m . . . um . . .waiting for my boyfriend.”

“Ah.” He let his hand drop to his side. “Seems to be a bit late.”

She blushed. Who else had noticed her sitting here for over an hour? “I’m sorry,” she offered lamely.

“No, it’s all right.” He got to his feet and started to walk away.

Who was she kidding? Robert wasn’t coming. If he happened to, he’d likely be drunk and she didn’t want to be around him .

“Wait.” Livy jumped up. She could at least have one dance on her birthday. Why should she spend the whole evening hurt and angry over Robert’s absence?

The young man slowly turned back around.

She attempted a genuine smile. “I’d love a dance.”

His face lit up as he smiled in return and held out his hand a second time. Setting her hat on her chair, Livy placed her hand inside his larger one and allowed him to escort her onto the dance floor. The band began to play a fox trot—one of Livy’s favorite dances. She and Joel had become fairly adept at the steps before he’d left for the war.

It felt strange, at first, to be in another man’s arms, but the feeling soon left her. The way he held her hand in a confident but gentle grip, his hand warm on her back, helped Livy relax. He led her around the floor, their feet walking or spinning in time with the music. He was as skillful at the fox trot as her brother, and Livy relished the chance to do more than just sway to the music.

“Are you from around here?” he asked her after a minute or two of dancing.

“About an hour away. And you?”

He shook his head. “I live outside of Hilden. In the county north of here.”

Livy vaguely recalled hearing the town name. “You drove all the way down here, just to go dancing?”

“We don’t have a public dance hall in Hilden. So we have to come here, or head farther north or drive all the way to Sioux City. Do you come to this one often?”

“I used to, before I went to college in Cedar Falls.”

With slight pressure to her back, he expertly led her through a spin before he picked up their conversation again. “What did you study in college?”

“Teaching.”

“Are you a teacher now?”

Livy frowned, doing her best to tamp down the seeds of resentment the question unearthed. She loved her family and wanted to lift the burden her brothers’ absence had created, but she missed college and the chance to pursue her own dreams.

“I was only able to attend for a year before I was needed here.” Her words drew a look of sympathy from him.

“I know what that’s like,” he murmured. Before she could ask what he meant, he poised another question. “Would you still like to be a teacher?”

“Very much. I’m hoping someday I’ll have the chance.”

The understanding in his blue eyes changed to enthusiasm. “That might be sooner than you think. The teacher at one of the township schools outside of Hilden was recently . . . .” He shot a glance at the floor, his jaw tightening. Livy wondered at the change in his mood. Then he guided her through another spin and his expression relaxed. “Suffice it to say, she’s gone now and I don’t think they’ve found a replacement. It’s a little far away, but you might want to inquire about it.”

A possible teaching job? A flurry of anticipation set Livy’s pulse moving faster at the possibility. She tried to squelch it with the reminder she wasn’t likely to be hired with only one year of schooling completed and no teaching certificate, but she couldn’t destroy the hope completely. How wonderful it would be to be on her own again, and not learning how to teach this time, but actually being the teacher.

Livy met his open gaze and found her thoughts moving from his idea to the man himself. She didn’t even know his name, and yet, she felt comfortable enough in his presence to share some of her regret at having her dream of teaching cut short. She hadn’t even voiced those feelings to Robert yet.

“Thank you,” she said, hoping he sensed how much she meant it. “I may look into it.”

“I hope you will.” He smiled in a way that made her stomach twist with unexpected pleasure.

She searched her mind for a more neutral topic, one that wouldn’t mean spilling more of her secrets to this stranger. “Do you live with family, up there in Hilden?”

He nodded. “I’ve got my father, stepmother and two half-siblings. What about you?”

“I’ve got a few more than two siblings.” Livy laughed. “I’m the third of seven. Five boys and two girls.”

She studied the firm shoulder beneath her hand. He appeared quite fit and healthy, so why wasn’t he a soldier? “Can I ask you something?”

“Sure.”

“How come you’re not wearing a uniform?”

Livy wished the question back at once when a shadow passed over his face, erasing the easy camaraderie between them. Before he could answer, the song ended. He released her hand at once, though he didn’t join her or the other couples in clapping.

She gnawed at her cheek, embarrassed at her apparent mistake. He’d been so kind to notice her distress earlier and suggest the teacher position in his town, and she’d repaid him by bringing up something he clearly did not wish to discuss.

“I’m sorry. It’s none of my business,” she said, rushing her words in an effort to keep him from disappearing into the crowd. “I didn’t mean to pry.”

He watched her, his expression guarded. What could she say to erase the awkwardness her inquiry had caused? They’d been having such a lovely time talking and dancing.

“I appreciate the dance. You see it’s my birthday and I adore the fox trot. So you’ve saved my evening, Mister . . .” She waited for him to fill the pause with his name.

The corners of his mouth worked up into a smile. “How about you call me ‘the birthday rescuer?’”

Livy chuckled. She wasn’t sure why he refused to give his name, but she wouldn’t press it—not after her blunder about the uniform. His kindness had completely changed her botched evening. “Thank you for the dance, birthday rescuer. And for telling me about the teacher position.”

“You’re welcome. Do I get to know the name of the birthday girl?”

Two can play at his game, Livy thought with a smirk. “How about ‘the girl I danced with once?’”

Buy: Hope at Dawn (Of Love and War)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Review: You Belong to My Heart by Nan Ryan

you belong to my heartReviewed by Lynn Reynolds

The setting is Civil War-era Tennessee.

Mary Ellen Preble goes down to the river but gets a surprise when she gets there. Clayton Knight grew up alongside Mary Ellen. As you read this story, you will find that it is linked with actual historical figures. It shows the amount of research or love for the time period that went in to developing this story.

If you like setting your ambience as you get into the mood for reading, I can almost picture reading while sitting on a swing under a huge tree. There would be a gentle breeze and the dress would have to be one from that time period – and don’t forget the bonnet. Or maybe you’re even sitting on a blanket under said tree waiting to enjoy a picnic with your true love.

Maybe you like to travel. Why not take this book and travel around the state of Tennessee and learn about some of the state’s history. It may sound a little morbid but why not go to an old cemetery and find a comfortable spot to sit, read, and try to think if some of those people around you were friends with our couple.

I had no trouble picturing everything in my mind because this author’s descriptions are that good. Nan shows the reader how two people can go from first love, to summer love, and then to a forever love. But with any first love, life and parents can get in the way.

We also see the sad parts – one being a female during that time period. Women had few choices back then and it seemed as if it was always the wife’s fault if the husband didn’t get the things he wanted – just a big bully. It’s also a reminder of how far we have come with a lot of things. But pain doesn’t change no matter if it’s the 1800’s or now.

It also must have been a hard book to write since we know how some of it ends. But you can still feel the emotions that come alive with Nan’s words. If you love(d) the film “Gone With The Wind”, this would make a great follow up. It helps to fill in some of the more romantic scenes that they couldn’t shoot back in the 1930’s.

As you get toward the end, just like the family members of the military, this author has the reader holding their breath until they find out for sure if the main characters got their happily ever after. But you have to keep reading because you want to know if you’re going to be right or wrong. I’ve been reading all types of romance novels for a long time and it’s sad to say that this is the first Nan Ryan book I have ever read. Now that I have, I know it won’t be that long before I read another one. And I hope you won’t wait as long as I did. And if you love a good historical romance, you will get your money’s worth with this book.

Rating: ★★★★☆

Buy: You Belong to My Heart

[phpbay]you belong to my heart nan ryan, 10, “”, “”[/phpbay]

How I Screwed Up My First Romance Novel

passing wind of loveGuest Blog by John Blumenthal, co-author of Passing Wind of Love

Inspired by the gazillions of dollars people are making in the romance novel genre, I decided to write one with a friend, Barry Golson. Granted, the genre is dominated by women, but so what? How hard could it be?

Besides, Barry and I weren’t exactly neophytes. Some years ago, we’d cut our teeth on a short romance novella called Love’s Reckless Rash, written under the pen name Rosemary Cartwheel. Granted, it was a spoof but it gave us a feel for the lingo. We knew our way around the territory.

Sort of.

But this time, we vowed to write a straight one. Our heroine would succumb to fiery passion, flaming eroticism, burning desire and lots of other forms of romantic arson.

Sure, there would be challenges. First, we would have to attempt to see things through a female’s perspective, which meant that power tools would not figure prominently in the plot.  Also, we don’t know anything about romance because we’re guys and we don’t understand things like why women like candles so much. We asked our wives for help but they thought the idea of guys – especially us — writing a romance novel was… well… idiotic.

We decided to ignore them.

Having written Love’s Reckless Rash as a period piece, we felt comfortable with the historical approach. It would take place in Jane Austen’s era. There would be dukes and earls and princes, all of them incredibly horny because in those days first base meant getting beyond the bustle.

The era’s sexual repression also appealed to us as did the language of the day -– words like “hither” and “hence” and “bodice” (although we had to look up “bodice” in a dictionary.)

So far so good. We mapped out a story. Now, all we had to do was fill the pages. Easy right?

Nope.

Ten pages into it, we encountered problems. Every time our story required us to describe ball gowns, sensuous fragrances, the intricacies of corsets or most importantly, the mysteries of the female heart, we’d get stuck.

How did we compensate for our ignorance? Simple. We went for laughs. Again. We simply couldn’t write it without cracking up.  Every time we tried to craft a lurid sex scene we couldn’t resist a punch line.

Often, we’d start a sentence with the best of intentions, but end up with this:

“I have never felt my heartstrings pulled so sharply as they are being pulled at this moment. I feel as if they will snap, and my heart will be flung across the garden into yonder lake.”

“She knew her One True Love was out there somewhere, practicing cruel expressions in the mirror, opening his shirt just so, and in general posing rakishly, roguishly, and redundantly.”

“’Sir, kindly remove your nose from my bosoms this instant! Bosoms are not places into which one inserts one’s nose. If bosom nosing is a custom in this vile place, it is not one that I care to have performed on my bosoms!!’”

You get the idea. Eventually, we succumbed to temptation. We expanded our original spoof to novel length, sending our heroine on new adventures to foreign places where she would encounter a variety of slow-witted potential paramours of different nationalities, and upper-class twits, most of who would –- of course — ardently attempt to unravel her sixteen petticoats. We titled it, Passing Wind of Love.

In other words, we fell back into the ditch.

And we still don’t understand why women like candles so much.

Passing Wind of Love Blurb:

Based on the 1984 cult classic, “Love’s Reckless Rash”, (which the Cincinnati Inquirer called “A gem…a biting romance parody”), “Passing Wind of Love” takes our heroine, Vanessa Hardleigh-Bourne-Bryte, to new heights of romantic hilarity and expands her adventures to new places where she is chased by a variety of new ardent lovers.

Given to swoons, impromptu raptures and lapses of extreme dimness, young Lady Vanessa is possessed of a dazzling Beauty that causes 19th-century noblemen to go into cardiac arrest Inevitably, she meets her One True Love–the rakish, reckless, roguish Duke of Earl–in this picaresque tale set in semi-Victorian England and semi-barbaric America. It’s for lovers of wordplay, literary banter and flagrant historical inaccuracies – Jeeves meets Emma. (That would be Wodehouse meets Woodhouse, wouldn’t it? Never mind.

Its cast of characters–nearly all with either a screw loose or no brains to speak of–include Lord Gastleigh (upper class twit), Trapper Jacques (loathes bathing) Dowager Duchess Maggie (from downtown Abbey), the Queen of England (very stout), Prince Albrecht (in the can), Lord Roscoe Jagger (demanding satisfaction), Wyatt Earp (lightning fast), Beau Weevil (lightning slow) and Thaddeus Cruise (short, handsome,).

Her adventures take her from the Queen’s dysfunctional court to a Mississippi steamboat piloted by Mark Twain to the body-littered streets of Tombstone, to the burlesque stages of olde Hollie Woods, thence to a nunnery where she must uncover a dark family secret from a silent Trappist monk via charades.

Every man who meets Vanessa becomes hopelessly smitten, while she tries valiantly to save herself for the always-bronzed and ever-chiseled Duke of Earl, not without a slew of sexual close encounters and pratfalls too embarrassing to reveal here. Passing Wind of Love is more than just a parody – it skewers religion, money, historical myths, English nobility, racism, gun control and show business. For sure, it’s the only romance novel directed at smart readers of both genders. (Don’t worry guys, Jane Austen doesn’t show up, although Darcy has a cameo.)

This fast-paced novel of high romance, glittering style, damnable puns and low intrigue will make you cheer for its indomitable heroine, sneer at its quirky villains and weep with laughter. You won’t be able to put it down. (Not without damaging your Kindle.)

Buy: PASSING WIND OF LOVE: A Hysterical Historical Romance

Audio Review: Royal Seduction (The Royal Princes of Ruthenia, Book 1) by Jennifer Blake

Royal SeductionHero: Prince Rolfe of Ruthenia, is ruthless in his pursuit of clearing his name and tracking down the traitor who murdered his older brother. Though he’s seen his brother’s mistress across ballrooms in Europe, he’s never gotten close enough to get a real good look. When he finds Angeline Fortin at a ball in Louisiana, he mistakes her for her cousin and won’t listen to her when she says otherwise. When she is caught alone, he kidnaps her and her innocence is only proven when he claims her.

Heroine: Angeline Fortin, is a poor relation in her aunt’s home. To protect her cousin from the dashing, but dangerous prince, they engineer a trip through the woods to the convent nearby. On her return to her aunt’s she is caught. Escape proves impossible and with one quick tumble her whole world alters its course. What is in store for her now? Surely she isn’t meant to be the prince’s mistress for the rest of her life?

Review: If you’re not into bodice rippers from the eighties avoid this one, if they are your cup of tea you might give Royal Seduction a try. My greatest dislike of the book was the cousin and her storyline which leads up to her character death. The girl was apparently at turns either a sex-addicted fiend, using sex as a way to manipulate her situation, or a victim who was raped a lot. I can’t say enough how much I disliked this part of the book. What saves the book is that the cousin is not the heroine, and the real heroine and hero are very compelling. Be warned though, because the first sexual encounter between the heroine and hero is a rape, not a forced seduction. That comes later. The prince’s men tell the Angeline at every turn that her life now is to be Rolfe’s mistress, not to expect marriage. Of course she never asks Rolfe and he never says what he’s thinking either. The misconception almost separates them for good.

Narrator: Melissa Reizian Frank has a very southern voice, which totally jarred me upon first beginning the story. Nothing about the blurb indicated it took place in America. I thought it would take place in Europe and I nearly quit right then. I find it very hard to listen to southern accents, when the narrator sounds far older than the age of the heroine. It’s a personal listening preference.

Rating: ★★★½☆

Buy: Royal Seduction (The Royal Princes of Ruthenia)

[phpbay]royal seduction jennifer blake, 10, 377, “”[/phpbay]

Audio Review: Over the Edge (Kincaid Brides, Book 3) by Mary Connealy

over the edgeHero: Seth Kincaid has landed in some very unusual circumstances. He survived a fire, ran off to partake in the Civil War, and apparently got hitched along the way. He just can’t remember it. He wants too, though. Very much.

Heroine: Callie has been praying and searching for her missing husband. Chances are he’s dead. But when she finds out he’s alive, well, you can’t blame her for wanting to wring his neck for abandoning her. The stupid man wants to rekindle their love, but she’s not so sure she can trust him.

Review: You will start this story off with a bang. Literally. You are in the middle of a robbery and a shooting. Callie is one tough cookie. More focus on romance, less on Seth’s secret subplot. In the end it was missing something for me and I just wasn’t enamored.

Narrator: Hillary Huber has a nice range in voices, but it was extremely hard to hear the exposition in Hillary’s natural voice, which is a lower register than the heroine’s voice. It broke the flow for me in a big way and kept drawing me out of the story.

Rating: ★½☆☆☆

Buy: Over the Edge (The Kincaid Brides Book #3)

Review: The Estate by J. Paulette Forshey

The EstateReviewed by Sandra Scholes

It is rare to find anyone whose dreams are real, but Cuillean Kelley thinks it is a possibility. Every night he wakes up after the same dream where a beautiful woman invades him and has him feeling as though his encounter with her was as real as breathing. His journey to the outskirts of Savanna takes him to where he can find a series of books, ones so rare he has a doubtful chance of actually finding them. These books he is looking for are to help the beauty in his dream world – she is trapped in a cruel prison not of this earth, and he wants more than anything to set her free.

J. Paulette gets right to the heart of the story with Cuillean going to find the books he needs so badly. The story sounds so poetic as though it were a dream even though he is awake, and shows how determined he is to give his dream woman a chance at life. As it is set during the time of the American Civil War, not everyone likes Cuillean being around them as they think he is a Yankee, but there are others who welcome him into their area even if he is a little worse for wear and unkempt.

There are plenty of rumours about an old house with ghostly and grizzly goings on after a murder, and the owner who originally wanted someone to catalogue his collection of arcane books. As no one has enough guts to go into the house, Cuillean is the one who thinks it would be good to give it a go. I loved the fact that Friday the 13th was chosen for when the ghostly events happened as the number alone is sure to give folk the willies.

Though it takes some time to get to the naughty bits, this is a very satisfying short novel many will enjoy reading on the train, bus or plane – it’s a real after work fix.

Rating: ★★★★☆

Buy: The Estate

American History Romances

thunder on the plainsGuest blog by Rosanne Bittner, author of Thunder on the Plains

Love, Romance, Passion – That’s a great blog title – and it’s what all lovers of romance novels want in their stories. You will find all three in anything written by Rosanne Bittner! I have been writing over 30 years, with 57 novels published and #58 coming in the spring of 2013, PARADISE VALLEY, a love story set in 1800’s Wyoming! The book will be published by Sourcebooks, and I will give it a big promotion, so watch for the details in my web site, www.rosannebittner.com and on my blog, www.rosannebittner.blogspot.com. And of course Sourcebooks will make lots of details available for you!

Right now I am promoting Sourcebooks’s reissue of one of my past titles, THUNDER ON THE PLAINS, a wonderful love story set against the building of America’s first trans-continental railroad. Just visit my virtual book celebration at http://rosannebittnerbookparty.blogspot.com/ to see how you can win free copies of THUNDER and possibly win my grand prize of a Kindle Touch!

You will love the hero and heroine in THUNDER ON THE PLAINS, and although Native Americans are not a big part of this particular story, I have written numerous books about American Indians. Part of my great passion for writing about America’s magnificent history is telling the truth about our Native Americans and the “not always very honorable” way in which our government treated its natives.

One of my best depictions of this history can be found in my 7-book SAVAGE DESTINY series, which is set in Colorado and involves (often in great detail) the history of the Cheyenne. After 30 years those books are still selling. I have also written about the Sioux, Comanche, Cherokee, Nez Perce and Apache. You can find out more about my books that depict Native American stories by visiting my web site.

I don’t think any of America’s own founders or government officials spoke with more eloquence or more bold truth and pride than some of the famed leaders of our Native Americans. One book that tells the real truth of what happened to our Natives is Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown. And the courage and pride of most Native American men make it easy to romanticize them in historical novels. I miss the 80’s and 90’s when Native American romance was at its peak. I hope that theme will return because I am ready with more stories!

In the meantime, I continue to write American history, and mostly about my great passion for the history of America’s Old West and Native Americans. Thanks for inviting me to contribute to your blog, and be sure to watch Sourcebooks and my web site for more news about books by Rosanne Bittner!

Buy: Thunder on the Plains