Review: A Lily Among Thorns by Rose Lerner

by Keira G on September 2, 2011 · 3 comments

in 4.5 Stars, ARC, Business, Gentry, Great Britain, J-L, Prostitute, Regency, Runaway

The Heroine: Serena learned the hard way that men couldn’t be trusted. She ran off to marry a young man from her father’s employ only to be jilted. Too proud to return home she took up life as a prostitute and learned that all men were pigs... all except 200 Pounds, the title she gave to another young man who left without her services and gave her money enough to start fresh. In her new life Serena vowed she would never be dependent upon a man again. When her path crosses 200 Pounds she’s determined to repay the debt, little knowing all he wanted from her was the real her not the persona she built as the Siren.

The Hero: Solomon is a man of honor and that makes him odd. Odder still is his preference for tinkering with chemicals to create dyes for cloth with one uncle when he could lead a life of privilege under his other uncle. He recognizes Serena as the prostitute he gave 200 pounds too as soon as they are alone in the dark, but not before. When a man from her past threatens her freedom with a fake marriage, Solomon is determined to help again even though he sought her first for help locating a family heirloom.

Review: Packed with intrigue, A Lily Among Thorns, brings together a beta hero with a backbone (he knows what he wants and won’t accept less) and a heroine who acts in spite of fear with a determination to be admired. The story is very character driven and sprinkled with spicy moments. I particularly liked when Solomon broke the lock dividing their two rooms and how Serena reacts (and thinks about it later too.) Only had one caveat, Solomon starts as a virgin hero and I missed any reference to him losing it before meeting Serena a second time, where he clearly knows what he’s doing. ;)

Rating: ★★★★½

Buy: A Lily Among Thorns, A Lily Among Thorns (UK)

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Sharon S. September 2, 2011 at 6:45 AM

Is this considered a historical read?

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2 Susan S. September 2, 2011 at 10:23 AM

Hi Sharon,
Under the tags it says Regency. It’s a historical somewhere between 1810-1820 England.

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3 Keira September 17, 2011 at 11:21 AM

Sharon – Yes, historical. :) It’s a Regency as Susan pointed out.

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